• Beautiful Art. Beautiful Walls.

    View our historic gallery in person or browse pieces online. Let us help you find just the right piece for your space.

    Browse ArtistsSearch Art
  • Your Art. Your Style.

    New art from Howard Terpning – A New Beginning

    Search ArtBrowse Artist
  • Art Made Personal

    By pairing unique artwork with our custom framing services, we can create a masterpiece tailored for you.

    Search ArtBrowse Artists
  • Bringing Your Walls To Life

    Choose pieces to warm up any room in your home or office. Create an unforgettable atmosphere with art from
    Wenaha Gallery.

    Search ArtBrowse Artists

Search Artists

Search the Gallery

Art Event: Debbie Bruce – Watercolors

Browse Debbie Bruce’s art:

The major rule about crossing the Grand Canyon on a tightrope — assuming that there is a list of rules somewhere — is that you don’t stop in the middle. Not an option.

And while creating a watercolor painting is not fraught with as many perils, the same requisites apply: you don’t stop in the middle, throw up your hands in consternation, and give up, whether the painting is going stunningly well, or teetering on the edge of collapse.

“My biggest challenge when I’m working on a piece is when I am about halfway through it,” says Deborah Bruce, a Walla Walla painter who has focused on watercolor for the last 20 years.

“If I have gotten to where I really like it, I become terrified that I am going to do something to ruin it.

“If I am not liking it, I struggle to keep going.

“I have one rule when I paint, and that is to finish regardless of how I feel about it in the middle. At times I am successful, and sometimes not, but I have found that what I think is a real mess can actually be fine if I just finish and don’t give up in the middle.”

Wise words, ones that get you over the scary part and to the other side. The medium of watercolor, Bruce explains, is neither forgiving nor easy, but its very difficulties are what make it fun to work with and wonderful to experience. Without the option of painting over mistakes, watercolor artists must plan out carefully where they want to start and end.

“It’s more about letting the light come through, knowing what to leave, and allowing the transparency and light and dark values to bring out drama and color,” she adds.

Retired from a career as professional florist for more than 30 years, Bruce is especially drawn to painting flowers, citing their variety, color, shape, and form.

To read the entire article, click here: https://wenaha.com/watercolor-florist-deborah-bruce-painter/

Debbie Bruce’s Art Event will be on display through Saturday, June 2, 2018.

(509)-382-2124 | (800)-755-2124

Email: art@wenaha.com

Art Event: Mary Calanche – Jewelry

Browse Mary Calanche’s art:

It sounds like one of those alarming math story problems people avoid if they possibly can:

“How many beads — of all sizes, shapes, and colors — fit into a 12 x 20 storage shed, with room left for the artist to work?”

Beading artist Mary Calanche of Dayton, whose studio is in such a shed, doesn’t have the answer, but she does know this:

“It’s stuffed full!”

Insulated, wired, and lighted, Calanche’s unique workroom is a place for intense concentration, meticulous attention to detail, and now and then, judicious use of the vacuum with a nylon stocking over the nozzle — one of the best ways to remedy the calamity of a flipped tray of tiny, tiny beads.

“If you haven’t ever dropped beads, then you’re just getting started into the craft,” Calanche, who has been creating beaded jewelry and other items for 25 years, says.

Under the business name, This n That, Calanche fashions earrings, necklaces, and bracelets using a variety of techniques: stringing beads onto wire or thread, weaving, wirework (which involves coiling, looping, and twisting wire that holds the beads), and bead embroidery (using a needle and thread to attach beads to a surface like fabric, suede or leather). She also experiments with finger weaving, metal work, and kumihimo, a Japanese technique of braiding silk strands to create colored cords.

“This is why I chose This n That as my name!”

Calanche started her foray into beading shortly after marrying her husband, GrayEagle. Watching him do projects for his dance regalia, Calanche decided to give it a try, with her first project being a flat, beaded rose. It remains a favorite piece because of its leather backing, which came from the last deer her father shot.

To read the entire article, click here: https://wenaha.com/beads-jewelry-mary-calanche-bracelet-necklace/

Mary Calanche’s Art Event will be on display through Saturday, June 16, 2018.

(509)-382-2124 | (800)-755-2124

Email: art@wenaha.com

Coming Soon – Special Art Show on Saturday, May 26, 2018

Join us at the gallery Saturday, May 26, 2018 from 10:30am – 1:30pm for a special art show featuring jewelry artist Mary Calanche, and painter Debbie Bruce. There will be free artisan treats as well, so be sure to stop by!

(509)-382-2124 | (800)-755-2124

Email: art@wenaha.com

Featured Artist

bracelet colorful bead jewelry mary calanche dayton
farmhouse winter country quilt landscape catherine little
autumn sunflower floral mixed media photographic art gay waldman
dragonfly insect watercolor bright color painting suzi vitulli richland
steptoe battlefield spokane indian wars 1858 nona hengen historical painting

What a great gallery!  I am impressed by the way you display the art.  The ambiance makes you want to stay.  I like the mix of national artists and local artists.  You have something for everyone – the serious art collector and the casual visitor.  The small gifts remind me of an excellent museum shop.

Larry O. Mausten, WI

The Wenaha Gallery feels like a second home to me. I always feel welcome when I come through the door; I’m not just another customer whose money they’re after, they really care.  In my personal experience with the gallery the staff bent over backwards to make me happy and this kind of quality is as valuable as the fine art they keep.

Katrina J. Dayton, WA

The client-centered service approach provided by Wenaha Gallery included much curiosity about what each piece of art or photography meant along with the history or story behind each piece.  The owners and staff took the time to understand not only the vision I had for each piece but wanted to understand the intended space, environment and lighting.  Their level of expertise about color provided fruitful conversation about each individual piece and the different framing/matting options.  The creative opportunities that arose between my vision, their vision, and their expertise lead to a custom conservation framing experience. The owners and staff working across the state in Dayton, WA were very creative and timely in conducting effective communications by knowing when best to use the phone, email, texting and/or social media.  In the end, the framed memories are inspiringly beautiful, preserved and even more meaningful.

Teresa A.

I have been coming to the Wenaha Gallery for several years and every time I walk in the door, there are new items to admire, new artists to view and interesting people to meet.  The staff is friendly, knowledgeable, and both able and willing to discuss any of the artists and their art.  From time to time I have had the Gallery frame some of the artistic pieces that are family heirlooms.  The care that they take to understand the piece, its history, and where I want to place it in my home adds to the pleasure of doing business with them.  When they are finished, the frame has become part of the artistic piece.  When I am in Eastern Washington, the Wenaha Gallery is a certain stop.

Ann G. Berrien Springs, MI

The framing memories project all started with the decision to develop a will and a desire to eventually will my meaningful art and/or photography to family and friends.  The experience with Wenaha Gallery would provide me with not only the most treasured framed memories but the most treasured experience.

Teresa A.